Thursday, November 26, 2015

We Don't Care About Black Friday.

That's a present: "Real-Life Responsive Web Design".
We keep our prices affordable. 365 days a year.

We Don't Care About Black Friday.

Good content has its price. We keep it affordable. Grab "Smashing Book 5: Real-Life RWD" today. Free shipping. Great gift for holidays, too.

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About The Book

Smart "responsive" workflows, effective responsive design/UX patterns and powerful front-end techniques — if you need a good book on real-life responsive design, our Smashing Book 5 is exactly what you need.

Design Process. SVG. Flexbox. Responsive Images. Web Fonts. Service Workers. Performance. Maintenance. Neatly packed in a gorgeous hardcover, it covers time-saving, practical techniques for crafting fast, maintainable and scalable responsive websites. Free worldwide airmail shipping. Get the book.

Hardcover, 584 pages. Written by Dan Mall, Sara Soueidan, Zoe M. Gillenwater, John Allsopp et al. Cover by Jessica Hische. Jump to table of contents.

Smashing Book 5: Real-Life Responsive Web Design, Print

$39

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Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Smashing Newsletter #148: Mobile, SVG and Accessibility

Front-end tools, clever tricks and eye candy. Issue #148 Tuesday, November 24th 2015 178,244 readers View in the browser

The Smashing Email Newsletter

Dear Friends,

Some things tend to appear more complicated than they really are. Accessibility is one of them. Often surrounded with misconceptions and myths, accessibility is often an afterthought, an obligatory website enhancement added by expensive consultants close to the release date of the project. However, accessibility is not something we add to a website, but something we start with and risk losing with every enhancement. It is to be retained. And it isn't that difficult — if you're writing meaningful, clean markup, of course.

Editorial

So what should a pragmatic barebones accessibility strategy look like? Simple. Consider keyboard users and screen reader users. Prefer meaningful native elements if possible: a button should be a button, for example. Define a sound structure in your markup: headings h1–h6 are helpful, but ARIA landmark roles are, too. If you can't, use ARIA-roles to explicitly state the function of an element.

Furthermore, define states and relationships between interactive elements with ARIA states and properties, so screen reader users can access them. For keyboard users, make all clickable elements focusable. And keep in mind that accessibility tools do have JavaScript support and screen readers can't predict structure or purpose, so we have to explicitly define it. Example? LinkedIn is doing a great job providing accessibility toolbar (hit "Tab" when using the page).

If we think about content first, and write clean markup, accessibility is provided by default. Then we define relationships between elements explicitly (roles, properties, states), refine ARIA-properties to get things done right and test keyboard and screen readers use. That's pretty much it. Complicated? By no means. And you can also use accessibility patterns, practical ARIA examples and Ally.js to help modern web applications deal with accessibility concerns. Also, highly recommended: the "Apps for All" eBook by Heydon Pickering.

Stay accessible!
Vitaly (@smashingmag)


Table of Contents

1. Mobile Design and Data from Luke Wroblewski
2. Seeking Hard Data: Performance Case Studies
3. Inspiration For Pricing Tables
4. Designing The Entire User Interface Stack
5. Lerp: Linear Interpolation in Animations
6. SVG Tips For Designers
7. How To Build A Pattern Library In Sketch
8. Gmail, Sketch and Slack Keyboard Shotcuts
9. The Museum Of The World
10. Upcoming Smashing Workshops
11. New On Smashing Job Board
12. Smashing Highlights
13. Recent Articles On Smashing Magazine

1. Mobile Design and Data from Luke Wroblewski

Digital product leader at Google and author of Mobile First, Luke Wroblewski has opened up a fascinating Google+ collection on mobile design and data. Containing a wealth of useful and sometimes intriguing information, presented in Luke's unique diagramming style, the collection brings together statistics and analysis of mobile apps, devices and users.

Mobile Design and Data from Luke Wroblewski

Whether it's technology, demographics or UX design, the statistics reveal some very interesting facets of the world we're designing in and for, and quite often the data overturns our assumptions and leads to insights that can help establish new directions for development. Be sure to check out Luke's other Google+ collections on wearables design, tinyfication and "design is never done". (og)


2. Seeking Hard Data: Performance Case Studies

The best way to convince colleagues and managers about the impact of... well, anything, is to provide some hard data. Case studies work best, figures work well, and increase in conversion strikes when it comes to a business perspective on front-end or UX.

Seeking Hard Data: Performance Case Studies

WPO Stats collects case studies and experiments demonstrating the impact of performance optimization on user experience and business metrics. There is literally no reason any more not to prioritize performance. The data speaks for itself, and now you can convince anybody about it, too. Run by Tammy Everts and Tim Kadlec. If you have a performance case study, make sure to submit it, too. (vf)


3. Inspiration For Pricing Tables

When you are offering a digital service, there is one essential component that your website won't get by without: the pricing table. Pricing tables all seem to follow the same pattern, but their styling possibilities are endless. If you need some fresh inspiration on how to display your pricing options in the best light, then Tympanus has got you covered.

Inspiration For Pricing Tables

Tympanus' collection features twelve different pricing table styles for you to explore — from smart and serious to playful, some of them with subtle hover effects others all minimalistic. A handy resource that is bound to cater for new ideas. (cm)


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4. Designing The Entire User Interface Stack

When designing in visual tools, we tend to spend a lot of tim pushing pixels and perfecting edges and shadows and radii, yet our final designs usually don't cover more than the ideal state of what a website would look like if everything worked just fine — decent browser, decent connectivity, reliable network and predictable user actions.

Designing The Entire User Interface Stack

But what about outliers? What about partial states, invalid states, disabled states, the timeouts, empty or overcrowded states, or just loading states in general? When designing an interface, we should be thinking about the full user interface stack and potentially nine states of user experience and carefully craft those imperfect experiences as well, documenting them in our pattern libraries just like we do with other compoennts. Our users will surely appreciate it. (vf)


5. Lerp: Linear Interpolation in Animations

We all want our online animations to be smooth and as naturalistic as possible, free of judder and jank. Over on CodePen, Rachel Smith has shared a technique she uses a lot for just this purpose: lerp, or linear interpolation. Put simply, it's a way of using a little bit of JavaScript to create an easing effect when an object moves from one point to another.

Lerp: Linear Interpolation in Animations

By interpolating a percentage of the distance between the start and end points, the amount the object moves becomes smaller as the distance between position and target decreases, meaning the object will slow down as it gets closer to its target. The CodePen includes a couple of neat examples of the effect, applied to mouse movement and scrolling. Something to consider for your next animated project? (og)


6. SVG Tips For Designers

With both designers and developers being involved in an SVG workflow, the SVG code often needs a second round of editing after it has been handed over to the developer, simply because a lot of designers know very little about the code behind the SVG. Sara Soueidan often experiences this in her projects, so to help designers cater for cleaner code, she published a row of valuable tips, dos and don'ts to prepare vector graphics and UI assets to become clean SVGs.

SVG Tips For Designers

Choosing the best suitable export options for the web is one aspect Sara is focusing on, but she also tackles issues such as the pros and cons of converting text to outlines or techniques to simplify paths. The tips are applicable in Adobe Illustrator as well as other graphic editors and are bound to make your team's SVG workflow smoother. (cm)


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7. How To Build A Pattern Library In Sketch

Have you ever struggled with keeping your designs consistent? Well, a pattern library can help. Instead of building complete pages, you establish all your UI elements — navigations, buttons, paragraphs, headings and forms — in a pattern library, so that you can reuse them any time to build pages that look consistently and are easy to maintain. If you want to get started with your own pattern library, Richard Child's article is a great starting point.

How To Build A Pattern Library In Sketch

Richard covers the basic steps you need to know to build a pattern library in Sketch — from setting up your artboard to using symbols, organizing text styles, and creating a color library. Now you only need some inspiration before you begin? styleguides.io features a lot of real-life pattern libraries that will get your mind buzzing with ideas. (cm)


8. Gmail, Sketch and Slack Keyboard Shotcuts

So what if you dedicated one minute today to learn 3 new keyboard shortcuts? If you're using Gmail, you can memorize a few obscure Gmail shortcuts that you haven't used yet. You can just press Shift + ? in Gmail to get an overview of available shortcuts.

Gmail, Sketch and Slack Keyboard Shotcuts

If you're using Sketch, Sketch Keyboard Shortcuts and Tricks will provide you with a few handy shortcuts for sure. And the Apple Keyboard Sketch file is available for free download as well. And with Slack keyboard shortcuts you might get even more productive. Also, what about taking a moment to rethink how you organize your email and design work? Perhaps there is a better way? (vf)


9. The Museum Of The World

The Rosetta Stone, the Parthenon sculptures, Egyptian mummies — all of them cornerstones of human culture, today they can be admired in the British Museum. Comprising more than 2,000,000 years of human history, its collection is exceptional and one of the largest of its kind. To make that cultural heritage accessible to more people from all over the world, the British Museum has recently partnered up with Google. The result: the Museum Of The World.

The Museum Of The World

The WebGL-powered desktop experience explores connections between the world's cultures by showcasing exhibits that shaped human history. As they travel deeper into the history of mankind with each scroll, users can browse the artefacts according to type and area of origin — no matter where in the world they might be located. Stunning. (cm)


10. Upcoming Smashing Workshops

With so many techniques, tools, libraries, design patterns, strategies, abstractions, frameworks and boilerplates available nowadays, what do you really need to know to keep your workflow fast, smart and efficient? That's exactly what our front-end and RWD workshops are all about: practical front-end and RWD workshops that will help you become better front-end developers and designers, today.

Upcoming Smashing Workshops

Full-Day Workshops at SmashingConf Oxford

Full-Day Workshops at SmashingConf San Francisco

But what about in-house training instead? We can improve your eCommerce checkout and conversion rates right on spot — or performance, accessibility or UX. Feel free to get in touch with Vitaly at vitaly@smashingconf.com and briefly describe what problems you're facing and would like to solve. Don't worry about the cost — we'll find a fair price for sure. Get in touch — it's that easy! (vf)


11. New On Smashing Job Board

Here are the recent job openings published on our Smashing Job Board:

  • Web Designer at U.S. News & World Report (Washington, DC)
    " This position requires an excellent eye for design, coupled with a keen ability to understand user needs, behaviors, and motivations. You should have strong Photoshop/Illustrator skills and be comfortable with HTML/CSS. Strong organizational and communication skills, attention to detail, and ability to meet deadlines are also required."

  • Web Developer/ Designer - MTV News at MTV News (New York, NY)
    "The ideal candidate should have strong full-stack development experience – as well as a strong visual eye and aesthetic. Think of it as 2/3 developer, 1/3 designer – in a mobile web-leaning context.


12. Smashing Highlights

  • The State Of Animation 2014
    The post-Flash era is hardly free of animation. CSS animation is quickly becoming a cornerstone of user-friendly interfaces on mobile and desktop, and JavaScript libraries already exist to handle complex interactive animations. In the wake of so much "CSS versus JavaScript animation" infighting, a new API specifically for web animation is coming out that might just unite both camps.

  • Original And Innovative Web Layouts
    The layout is the foundation of your website. It guides the user through the sections and tells them what is most important. It also sets the aesthetic of the website. Therefore, you need to carefully think through how you lay out content.

  • Exploration Of Single-Page Websites
    We tend to think of navigating a website as clicking from page-to-page via some kind of global navigation that's always visible. When it comes to a single page, we often think scrolling is the one and only way to move from one end to the next.


13. Recent Articles On Smashing Magazine


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The authors are: Owen Gregory (og), Cosima Mielke (cm), Iris LjeĆĄnjanin (il), Vitaly Friedman (vf), Christiane Rosenberger (research), Elja Friedman (tools).

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No Hard Feelings: The Wait For “Hardboiled Web Design” Is Over

The eBook is now available.
Get "Hardboiled Web Design" right away.

No Hard Feelings: The Waiting For "Hardboiled Web Design" Is Over.

The eBook of "Hardboiled Web Design" is now available — and printed copies ship from Dec 8th.

Hardboiled Web Design — 5th Anniversary Edition

$29 $39

Get the bookSave 25% today. Free airmail shipping on planet Earth.


About The Book

Some books deserve a spot at your desk. With a reputation for being a reference book that "spends more time open on the desk than closed in the bookcase", "Hardboiled Web Design" features a wealth of updated front-end techniques, strategies and attitude overhauls that anyone working on the web can benefit from.

Across 441 pages with plenty of code samples, the "hardboiled" ethos is about stripping markup and CSS to the bone, making it more flexible and scalable. You'll also get insights into Andy's workflow with clients such as ISO and WWF, and learn how to establish a design atmosphere and develop a style guide, create type proofs, use brand personality interviews and reduce wasted time in the process.

You'll also learn how to avoid predictable generic layouts and embrace creativity within a responsive mindset—and establish a better "responsive" process with clients. If you want to explore a great workflow for crafting rich and expressive responsive websites today, this book is your new constant companion. Ah, and did we say that it's gorgeous, too?

Softcover, 441 pages. Proudly published by yours truly Smashing Magazine. Jump to the table of contents..


What's In It For You?

If you're a front-end developer, you're in for a treat: the book focuses on practical cutting-edge techniques and a better process between developers, designers and clients. Build quickly and make fewer mistakes because you can use the actual technologies much earlier, using HTML and CSS to design, prototype and develop.

Hardboiled Web Design — 5th Anniversary Edition

If you're a designer, you'll learn how to embrace creativity within a responsive mindset and how to work better with clients. Explore a workflow that will not hold you back, and will not limit your potential for crafting rich and expressive responsive websites today.

Hardboiled Web Design — 5th Anniversary Edition


Takeaways From The Book

Technologies should never hold you back, and this book is nothing short of a strategic guide on how to use them efficiently to build flexible, scalable responsive systems today. Jump to the detailed table of contents.

  • Ready-to-use HTML/CSS code samples for your responsive sites,
  • Insights from actual RWD projects ranging from small businesses to household brand names,
  • Move towards designing atoms and elements first, and learn how to establish style guides,
  • Find out how to design atmosphere and choose breakpoints wisely with type proofs,
  • Dive deep into how to actually apply mobile first to a design workflow,
  • Benefit from HTML's semantic elements, WAI-ARIA roles and microformats2 alongside the BEM naming system,
  • Explore new CSS feature queries, Flexbox, background blends, CSS filters and how to make state changes smoother with CSS transitions,
  • Learn about the multi-column layout and how you can use it today.

Christmas has come early at our office; the fifth anniversary edition of Hardboiled Web Design is now available. Grab the print edition today (shipping starts on Dec 8th), get the eBook for free right away and save 25% off the regular price with a free worldwide airmail shipping. Ordering takes less than 30 sec, you know.

$29 $39

Get the bookWhat are you waiting for? Christmas?


Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Smashing Newsletter #147: Monsters, Performance and Flexboxes

When was the last time you felt completely lost? Issue #147 Tuesday, November 10th 2015 178,502 readers View in the browser

The Smashing Email Newsletter

Dear Friends,

When was the last time you felt completely lost — forced to explore the unknown, without any fallback to the comfortable, the familiar? Over the last few weeks, I've travelled over 26,000 miles between Barcelona and Sydney, with a 5-days-stop in Tokyo. The exploration of Tokyo probably was one of the most enriching and dazzling experiences I had in years. With everything looking, tasting, functioning differently, plastic food displays, convoluted underground interfaces, overly colorful package design and no fallback to English language, you start paying close attention to signs and sounds, gestures and facial expressions, interfaces and directional signage.

Tokyo, Japan

Yet the best bit happens when you strip away technology and wander on your own, trying to understand the city and create a map in your own head. That's how you end up in lovely authentic places and get an insight into what life really is like over there. That evening I returned to the hotel dizzling with thoughts and ideas that had to be written down until late night. So when you are travelling to a distant place next time, just walk to a random (safe) place outside the tourist attraction and try to find your way without technology. You might be surprised how rewarding and unique the experience will be.

Happy travelling and getting lost!
Vitaly (@smashingmag)


Table of Contents

1. Brainstorming, The Right Way
2. Budgets Are Good: Performance, UX and Content Budgets
3. What Kind Of Design Work Should I Do? A Flow Chart For Designers
4. BigRig: A Big Small Performance Testing Tool
5. Getting Started With Service Workers
6. Everything Is Better With Flexbox
7. Writing Better Email Subject Lines
8. Bringing Kids' imaginations to life
9. Upcoming Smashing Workshops
10. New On Smashing Job Board
11. Smashing Highlights
12. Recent Articles On Smashing Magazine

1. Brainstorming, The Right Way

We've all been in these uncomfortable meetings: somebody proposes an idea during the meeting which eventually leads to group brainstorming and group negotiation. Ideas need time to grow, flourish and eventually be prioritized, yet more often than not they get watered-down or just killed. Well, meetings don't have to be like that.

Brainstorming, The Right Way

Obviously, one rule to stick to at a meeting is that all ideas should be written down without immediate feedback or discussion, and then prioritized. At Google Ventures, meetings follow the "Note and Vote" principle: paper and pens are distributed, everyone writes down as many ideas as they can — quietly, within 5–10 mins, then each person takes 2 mins to review their list and pick a few favorites, the ideas are presented in the team and voted silently on the whiteboard, with a marker. Finally, a well-respected decider, not the group, makes the final call. The best part: everybody works in parallel and has a quiet time to think, and that's the core of productivity. (vf)


2. Budgets Are Good: Performance, UX and Content Budgets

Constrains are good; mostly because they prompt us to come up with creative solutions within strict requirements. That's how truly great solutions are born, because "when designers don't have constraints, they feel like they're wondering in the desert, and they don't know what's next" (Aarron Walter speaking at #btconf). The constraints can be reflected in budgets and documented from the day one of the design process.

Budgets Are Good: Performance, UX and Content Budgets

Performance budgets have become an established paradigm for prioritizing performance early on: we define how fast a website should start render in given conditions and set it as a goal. UX budgets provide us with a framework to identify critical task and the amount of time required to complete this task, and if the user surpasses a threshold, having an interface responding to it — perhaps to motivate the user to finish the checkout after 45s in the web form jungle. Gov.uk has just introduced Sentence length budget, with 25 words being the upper limit for a given sentence. Purpose? To keep the content concise and make it easier for users to understand. Now, what about setting up a few budgets in your company? (vf)


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3. What Kind Of Design Work Should I Do? A Flow Chart For Designers

"What projects should I take on? Where should I work? What should my career look like?" Questions like these bother all of us sometime during our career, but especially young designers who are new to the industry. Julie Zhuo, product design director at Facebook, gets asked these questions a lot, and she often wishes that she could better illustrate what she wants to convey when giving advice. So in an attempt to do so, she created a flow chart that tries to help designers who are still looking for their place in the industry to find their path.

What Kind Of Design Work Should I Do? A Flow-Chart For Designers

The central question is basically "what do you care about"? From there on, the flow chart provides different paths depending on what a designer wants to achieve with their work. Do impactful work, learn how to be a better designer, make a lot of money, or have fun — whatever it is that drives you, Julie's flow chart is bound to provide you with inspiration on where to find the challenge you are looking for. (cm)


4. BigRig: A Big Small Performance Testing Tool

So here is a problem: you need extended data about what's going on, while important parts of your website are being rendered. What if you could easily discover how much time the browser spends in JavaScript during page load, and of the time in JavaScript, what script in particular was the longest-running? Or, during a scroll, what is the fps and how much time does the browser spend in styles, layout, paint, and composite during each frame? That's exactly what Google's Paul Lewis decided to fix.

BigRig: A Big Small Performance Testing Tool

The result is Big Rig, an open-source tool that is available in two flavours: a web-based UI is handy if you have no performance workflow in place and just want to start tracking things without getting into much config. A CLI/Node.js module lets you integrate it into an existing workflow and have it pass data back to some other dashboard or endpoint. (vf)


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5. Getting Started With Service Workers

What experience do you provide to your users on a shaky connection? What if you wanted to speed up your performance drastically? Well, all of it is possible with Service Workers, and if most of your users are browsing via Chrome, ServiceWorkers can be used to progressively enhance user experience in capable browsers and upcoming browser versions.

Getting Started With Service Workers

Nicolas Bevacqua has published a guide/tutorial on getting started with ServiceWorkers in which he explains step-by-step how you can use the technology and what happens under the hood. UpUp is a JavaScript wrapper around ServiceWorkers which makes it very simple to serve specific content to your users, even when they are offline. In fact, The Guardian published an article explaining how the team used ServiceWorkers to build a custom offline page for the site.

Browser support, you ask? Well, we're getting there, and there is a shared agreement across browser-makers that it's an important technology, so we shouldn't be waiting for it too long. (vf)


6. Everything Is Better With Flexbox

Some front-end challenging can be quite frustrating to solve with good old-fashioned CSS, yet they are peanuts if you are using Flexbox. Laura Kalbag has decided to build a flexible, responsive HTML5 video player with Flexbox just because using floats and positioning wouldn't provide a flexible enough solution.

Everything Is Better With Flexbox

Laura uses Modernizr to feature detect Flexbox, and progressively enhances the player if Flexbox is supported. The entire player container is a Flexbox, the time takes up all the space it needs (and no more), and the progress bar fills the remaining space. The play control buttons then sit on the left side, and the volume on the right, both roughly filling half the space.

Next the volume controls need to be stuck to the right side and to achieve play/pause buttons to be residing in the centre, we can turn a flex-item into a Flexbox and align items across the main axis (horizontally) and the cross axis (vertically). Old browsers get an "okay"ish, non-enhanced version of the player. Done. Ah, need to figure out how Flexbox calculates the width of flex items? Here you go: Flexbox Width Tester. (vf)


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7. Writing Better Email Subject Lines

When you send out the email newsletter, the subject line often is an afterthought... actually, it's a "last-minute" thought, isn't it? And yet, a subject line is the very first impression your subscribers will get, no matter if it's on mobile or desktop. So if you are sending out mailings a lot, spending time to craft a meaningful and useful subject line is very well worth it.

Writing Better Email Subject Lines

How to get started? Well, Campaign Monitor has published a very useful Subject Line Superhero PDF Guide (2 Mb) which might help you to get better in your subject line copywriting skills. It comes up with three examples for each of the 17 subject line categories they have identified and helps you figuring out what the most appropriate style for your list could be. Litmus also provides an a few tips for writing subject lines and Mailchimp features what subject lines have better and worse open rates. Worth downloading and reading. (mse)


8. Bringing Kids' imaginations to life

Guess what happens if 100 kids draw monsters and 100 illustrators bring those kids' imaginations to life? Probably something hilarious and very refreshing. Katherine Johnson did just that: she simply invites Elementary students to draw monsters, and once their creations have taken shape, she works with illustrators to bring them to life in their own artistic styles. And then children can see what their idea sparked in others.

Bringing Kids' imaginations to life

The ultimate goal is to help children recognize the value of their ideas and make them feel excited about the creative potential of their own minds. The project is called The Monster Project. At the moment, the site features over 100 monsters created by over 100 artists from all over the world. Like the project? You can back up Katherine on Kickstarter too, you know. (mse)


9. Upcoming Smashing Workshops

With so many techniques, tools, libraries, design patterns, strategies, abstractions, frameworks and boilerplates available nowadays, what do you really need to know to keep your workflow fast, smart and efficient? That's exactly what our front-end and RWD workshops are all about: practical front-end and RWD workshops that will help you become better front-end developers and designers, today.

Upcoming Smashing Workshops

Full-Day Workshops at SmashingConf Oxford

Full-Day Workshops at SmashingConf San Francisco

But what about in-house training instead? We can improve your eCommerce checkout and conversion rates right on spot — or performance, accessibility or UX. Feel free to get in touch with Vitaly at vitaly@smashingconf.com and briefly describe what problems you're facing and would like to solve. Don't worry about the cost — we'll find a fair price for sure. Get in touch — it's that easy! (vf)


10. New On Smashing Job Board

Here are the recent job openings published on our Smashing Job Board:

  • Design Director at Bonanza.com (Seattle, WA)
    "Bonanza is seeking a Design Director to join our award-winning marketplace team. This is a great opportunity for a design pro with a proven track record of leadership and excellence to make a big impact in our fast-growing company."
  • Senior UX Designer/ Architect at EclecticIQ (Amsterdam, NL)
    "We build complex data intensive software for a niche market within Cyber Security where customers have different levels of maturity. It's a web application for desktops used by highly specialised users. Creating a balanced experience where the user will find all the information and features they need without it feeling like the cockpit of a Boeing 747."
  • Full Stack Web Developer at The Dedham Group (New York, NY)
    "Our ideal candidate has experience with both front-end and back-end technologies (i.e., JavaScript, HTML, CSS, PHP, Python, Ruby, Java, but we are not tied to a particular technology stack) as well as indexing, building search functions, and form controls. Candidates should have a portfolio of previous work."

11. Smashing Highlights

  • Best Practices of Combining Typefaces
    Creating great typeface combinations is an art, not a science. While there are no absolute rules to follow, it is crucial that you understand and apply some best practices when combining fonts in a design. We will take a close look at some the best practices for combining typefaces — as well as some blunders to avoid.

  • Help The Community: Report Browser Bugs
    You might think that reporting the bug would be pointless, because it would take ages to fix, and would take even longer for users to upgrade to the fixed version. However, for all browsers except Internet Explorer (IE), this is not true anymore. Also, some bugs get fixed quite quickly, especially the ones that come with a decent report. Keep reading, and your own bug reports will likely fall in this latter category.

  • Showcase of Web Design in Russia (2009)
    The land mass that is one-sixth of the Earth is always surprising. This article presents the state of the art of web design in Russia — in fact, it won't dwell on the classic stereotypes but will rather look at the creativity flowing through.


12. Recent Articles On Smashing Magazine


Sent to truly smashing readers via Mailchimp.
We sincerely appreciate your kind support. You rock.

Email: newsletter@smashingmagazine.com
Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

The authors are: Cosima Mielke (cm), Markus Seyfferth (mse), Vitaly Friedman (vf), Christiane Rosenberger (research), Elja Friedman (tools).

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